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PostPosted: Sun Oct 21, 2012 12:19 am 
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Howdy people.

I have a Lexicon Alpha 24 bit audio interface. I opened a new project and recorded something with device set to WaveRT. Signal path was guitar straight into Lexicon. Here’s what the Mixcraft log showed: Sound Engine Format: 44100 hz, 32 bits, 2 channels.

Then I changed to the Lexicon ASIO and the log now shows: Sound Engine Format: 44100 hz, 16 bits, 2 channels.

I’m a bit technically challenged when it comes to computers. :roll: Can someone explain what “bits” are and why they differ in my example above? How can I get to record at 24 bit as my interface says?

Thanks for your patience in advance.

Trevor

EDIT: OK, so I've been reading up on the subject and playing around with settings. If I set the device to Wave, I can customise the sample rate and bit depth to 24/44.1 but can't seem to do this on ASIO or WaveRT.

EDIT 2: Does it then follow that I should use Wave to guarantee 24 bit recording?

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PostPosted: Sun Oct 21, 2012 1:40 pm 
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If you go into the preferences for Mixcraft then Sound Device you should be able to check ASIO as your driver. Click the drop down menu for ASIO Device and chose the Lexicon Alpha driver. After that you can then click Open Mixer button to access the Lexicon ASIO driver. You should be able to set your bit depth to 24 bits there.

Note that my ASIO driver has a "force driver to 16 bit" check box. If your driver has that make sure it is not checked. Again, click open mixer in the Mixcraft Sound Device preferences to access the extra driver features.

Hope this helps. :)

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PostPosted: Sun Oct 21, 2012 2:17 pm 
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Thanks for the reply SoundSquire!

When I open the mixer (see below) all I have is this slider. I normally have it set where it is as latency is not an issue. But if I record something, shut down Mixcraft and then have a look at the log file, it says Sound Engine Format: 44100 hz, 16 bits, 2 channels.


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lexicon.jpg
lexicon.jpg [ 45.01 KiB | Viewed 664 times ]

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Trevor

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When I listen, I forget. When I see, I remember. When I do, I understand. Confucius
I started out with nothing - and still have most of it left! - Seasick Steve
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PostPosted: Sun Oct 21, 2012 3:13 pm 
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The Alpha has a newer Windows driver v2.7.
http://www.lexiconpro.com/en-US/product ... s_and_docs

Try that and see if it helps out. :?: :)

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PostPosted: Sun Oct 21, 2012 3:30 pm 
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From Wikipedia:

Quote:
Bit depth (quantization)
Audio is typically recorded at 8-, 16-, and 20-bit depth, which yield a theoretical maximum signal to quantization noise ratio (SQNR) for a pure sine wave of, approximately, 49.93 dB, 98.09 dB and 122.17 dB.[3] Eight-bit audio is generally not used due to prominent and inherent quantization noise (low maximum SQNR), although the A-law and u-law 8-bit encodings pack more resolution into 8 bits while increase total harmonic distortion. CD quality audio is recorded at 16-bit. In practice, not many consumer stereos can produce more than about 90 dB of dynamic range, although some can exceed 100 dB. Thermal noise limits the true number of bits that can be used in quantization. Few analog systems have signal to noise ratios (SNR) exceeding 120 dB; consequently, few situations will require more than 20-bit quantization.

For playback and not recording purposes, a proper analysis of typical programme levels throughout an audio system reveals that the capabilities of well-engineered 16-bit material far exceed those of the very best hi-fi systems, with the microphone noise and loudspeaker headroom being the real limiting factors.

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PostPosted: Sun Oct 21, 2012 11:46 pm 
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Problem solved! :D

I did update the driver some time ago, but the latest download seems to have fixed the problem.

Thanks so much Sam - also for the explanation on the techie stuff. Much appreciated.

Best

Trevor

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When I listen, I forget. When I see, I remember. When I do, I understand. Confucius
I started out with nothing - and still have most of it left! - Seasick Steve


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PostPosted: Mon Oct 22, 2012 9:37 am 
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Hi,

It's amazing how many problems can be fixed by a simple audio driver update.

Thanks for posting the solution you found!

Greg


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