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Adobe Audition

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kenrob2037
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Adobe Audition

Postby kenrob2037 » Tue May 09, 2017 9:55 pm

Hi Everyone,

Is anyone using Adobe Audition to mix and master their tracks?

I've just started using it and find it quite amazing. One of the beauties of the post production tool is the vast array of options it offers to mix and master your tracks, they seem endless.

What I've found interesting is, when comparing commercial tracks with mine. Almost every one red lines throughout most of the songs. It didn't matter if it was classical, jazz, pop, rock or EDM, almost all red lined on the level meter.

I find this odd. We are told to always make sure our music does not constantly spike into the red zone, but I found that almost all commercial tracks did. Some just hit the top throughout the whole song, but still sounded fine.

I was wondering if anyone had any thoughts on this?

Cheers

rob

aj113
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Re: Adobe Audition

Postby aj113 » Thu May 25, 2017 2:00 pm

Red is just a colour. It does't really mean anything per se.

kenrob2037
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Re: Adobe Audition

Postby kenrob2037 » Thu May 25, 2017 3:24 pm

The red zone is the very top of the db meter, and as almost all commercial songs at the top, that means they couldn't be any louder, but most still sounded fine. If this is how commercial mixes are mastered today? And, doesn't that mean that most have the same dynamic?

There seems to be almost no lows, or mids, only highs.

aj113
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Re: Adobe Audition

Postby aj113 » Thu May 25, 2017 3:40 pm

kenrob2037 wrote:The red zone is the very top of the db meter, and as almost all commercial songs at the top, that means they couldn't be any louder, but most still sounded fine.
Almost all mixes, commercial or otherwise, are normalised to 0db, which means they will hit the 'red zone' at some point. Some hit it more often than others, but there is absolutely nothing wrong with peaking at 0db.
And, doesn't that mean that most have the same dynamic?
No, it's impossible to come to such a conclusion merely by observing a red colour on a meter.

There seems to be almost no lows, or mids, only highs.
Highly unlikely. I mean, do you really believe that all commercial recordings have no mids or lows?

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AHornsby
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Re: Adobe Audition

Postby AHornsby » Sat May 27, 2017 7:07 am

VU meters were originally mechanical devices. Right? Used in broadcasting radio?

I can understand -- in the good old reel-to-reel tape days -- that saturation could have been a problem and so the VU metering needed to become standardized. Plus, it's questionable that the math involved in programming a present-day DAW or plug in, is the same from program to program.

Some sound dogs, me included, just believe that some 'head space' is a desirable quality to have across the board.

The venue, whether it be live or on Soundcloud or Youtube or where ever, is going to squash your music more than enough (necessary?) anyway.


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