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Headphones for mixing

Posted: Sat Aug 04, 2018 7:57 pm
by mixyguy2
Spinning off another thread...

I'm eyeing the AT 20Xs (for mixing and tracking, actually). I've talked to various people and don't get the impression the diff between them and the pricier line of ATs is much, if at all, and apparently they don't have the extra low end that the others have (caveat, have not used). Quite a bargain for $50, it would seem.

Would like to hear from others, esp those who have tried more than one.

Re: Headphones for mixing

Posted: Sun Aug 05, 2018 11:40 am
by Acoustica Eric
I've got a few different sets in my studio.
4 sets of KRK kns-8400
1 set of Scarlette HP60 MKII that came with a focusrite interface
1 set of SACB1-SM (supposed to be the greatest thing since pizza)

The scarlette headphones whip the rest, easily.

Sorry I do not have experience with the models you are asking about.

Re: Headphones for mixing

Posted: Sun Aug 05, 2018 2:10 pm
by trevlyns

Re: Headphones for mixing

Posted: Sun Aug 05, 2018 4:30 pm
by mick
I have AKG K92 and am happy with them comparing them with the Beyerdynamic dt231 I had for years, both are budget headphones. The AKG are more detailed, bass is lighter but sounds more correct and need less power.
This is a tricky subject because ears change with age, high frequencies fall off so headphones chosen by a 20 year old may not suit a 50+ year old as the high's could be perceived as lacking. My left ear is different to the right, it has a better high sensitivity so using a telephone goes on the left as the right leans toward a very slight muddy tone. I'm not deaf just have 2 ears that work different. I don't recommend buying any without trying 3 or 4 different ones using a sound file that you are familiar with, everybody will have a different opinion with every model, some will not like the AKG but for me they seem pretty good. When I bought the Beyerdynamic years ago the shop tried to push some Sennhieser (don't know the model) but they sounded seriously flat with no detail or space "its a good seller" I was told but the Beyer outshone by far, and now the AKG outshine the beyer.

Re: Headphones for mixing

Posted: Sun Aug 05, 2018 5:25 pm
by Thomas
I don't have a lot of experience with different models but I'd second the recommendation to use a reference sound file to compare. Also, AFAIK, different headphones are well suited for different purposes. IE, what's good for rock might not be good for classical; in addition, what might be good for enjoying music might not be best for mixing music. I have read that it's best not to have something that boosts frequencies too much.

According to Mike Senior, author of Mixing Secrets For The Small Studio: "It’s the low end of the audio spectrum that presents the toughest mixing challenges when you’re working under budgetary constraints, and in my experience it’s this aspect of small-studio mixes that most often falls short when compared with professional productions."

Re: Headphones for mixing

Posted: Tue Aug 07, 2018 2:13 am
by Starship Krupa
I have a pair of Samson SR850's and like them for silent mixing and referencing.

I've been looking for a budget "sleeper" pair of closed-back cans to replace my Sennheiser HD-280's, which I never really clicked with.

Re: Headphones for mixing

Posted: Tue Aug 07, 2018 9:19 am
by dpaterson
Hello.

Wow. Some great info. on this thread I must say. Thanks to all.

One thing I'd like to chime in about (as it's not something that I find emphasized enough in spite of the fact that it may seem wildly obvious):

Getting that perfect mix on that perfect set of headphones is a great pursuit no question. But for me: if I sound great on my PA, home theater system (an el cheapo to be honest), and in my car well, then, I've cracked it. Quite a few times (especially of late given that I'm now actually WORKING at this FINALLY) I've done something and thought "hey: that sounds great (on my headphones)" but then it's fallen over on my PA (for example). I've also found that listening to something in mono points out some shortcomings that you may not hear on a nice wide stereo system. Also: listen to your stuff on the likes of an iPad, smartphone, and even on those internal (horrible) notebook speakers (they too are pretty good at accentuating certain issues: phase problems being but one of them) (and I speak from bitter experience).

Like I said: the above may be obvious but I don't see it given much attention for some reason.

Oh and interesting comment re: the Focusrite headphones (thanks Eric). When my Sennheiser's pack up eventually (although I'd be very surprised if that ever did happen) maybe that's an idea.

Regards,

Dale.

Re: Headphones for mixing

Posted: Tue Aug 07, 2018 7:11 pm
by mixyguy2
Thx all for the input so far. Really the mixing will be secondary to listening on my speakers, but still a consideration.

Re: Headphones for mixing

Posted: Tue Aug 07, 2018 9:42 pm
by Thomas
Starship Krupa wrote:I have a pair of Samson SR850's and like them for silent mixing and referencing.

I've been looking for a budget "sleeper" pair of closed-back cans to replace my Sennheiser HD-280's, which I never really clicked with.


I noticed those and the 950s. What are your thoughts on the 850? I've got an old pair of Sony's with too much bass boost and looking to get something else for mixing. At first I didn't get "silent mixing", then after more reading I figured you meant quiet environment because of the open style.

Re: Headphones for mixing

Posted: Thu Aug 09, 2018 1:12 pm
by midimoose
I'll have to give Starship Krupa a second thumbs up on the Samson SR850's. I bought a pair last winter for about 35 bucks, and find they work well for me for mixing, with what I consider a fairly flat response.
Certainly no hyped bass response. If anything, they're a bit strong in the mid to high range, but so are my monitors--(M-audio BX5 carbons). This works out well for me, since I can switch between monitors/headphones with very little difference in what I hear. Ah... so subjective with so many variables. Just my 2 cents worth. I love my Sennheisers for general listening, but too much "color" for mixing or reference. I find the Samsons very comfortable, and often forget I have them on. Best of luck tracking down what works best for your ears! Rick.

Re: Headphones for mixing

Posted: Thu Aug 09, 2018 8:30 pm
by mixyguy2
Thanks, but since I'll be using for recording, I need closed back. :)

Re: Headphones for mixing

Posted: Mon Aug 13, 2018 10:49 am
by Ianpb
For tracking, audio quality is not a priority, and for that I use the very modestly priced Sennheiser HD201 headphones. They are light, comfortable, stable on the head (even for a mad headbanging drummer) and very clear. What's more, they help to avoid restrained and underwhelming vocal performances because they don't 'big up' the sound like hi-fi headphones tend to do.

For mixing, I refer you to my review of the excellent Superlux HD681F:
https://forums.acoustica.com/bbs/viewtopic.php?t=23252 - Eric, perhaps this should be moved to 'Hardware Wars'?

I wasn't impressed with the Samson 850. They're okay for listening if you're a bass-head but, contrary to midimoose's claim, I found the frequency response to be far from flat, with hyped low frequencies.

Re: Headphones for mixing

Posted: Mon Aug 13, 2018 3:27 pm
by mixyguy2
Thanks but I'm looking for one pair to do both, not separate for tracking and mixing (and therefore need closed back).

Re: Headphones for mixing

Posted: Mon Aug 13, 2018 3:55 pm
by Ianpb
mixyguy2 wrote:Thanks but I'm looking for one pair to do both, not separate for tracking and mixing (and therefore need closed back).

If you're determined to have a single closed-back headphone for both, perhaps the Beyerdynamic DT250 would suit your requirements.

Re: Headphones for mixing

Posted: Mon Aug 13, 2018 5:29 pm
by mixyguy2
I'll check em out, thanks!