Does anyone use Monster headphones?

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MRJONAH
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Does anyone use Monster headphones?

Post by MRJONAH » Tue Dec 29, 2015 12:53 pm

For what little I do I've been using JVC "ear buds". They sound really good. Over Christmas I did a small upgrade to Monster Clarity HD ear buds. The JVC's sounded way better. How are Monster headphones? Or can someone recommend a good headphone for $100 or less to use with M.C. 7? I do hard rock-metal.

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Mark Bliss
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Re: Does anyone use Monster headphones?

Post by Mark Bliss » Tue Dec 29, 2015 10:21 pm

I am not certain, but I think Monster's fall under the "expanded bass" category. If so they arent suitable for mixing, if thats what you are looking for.

I cant advise on personal experience, but if I was looking for a pair of decent cans at that price point at this moment, I would consider these:
http://www.sweetwater.com/store/detail/EX25
Stay in tune, Mark

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gypsy101
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Re: Does anyone use Monster headphones?

Post by gypsy101 » Wed Dec 30, 2015 6:51 am

AKG K-240 semi-open back (on sale $69-$79)
http://www.sweetwater.com/store/detail/K240S


Sennheiser HD 280 closed back $99
http://www.sweetwater.com/store/detail/HD280Pro

MRJONAH
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Re: Does anyone use Monster headphones?

Post by MRJONAH » Sat Jan 02, 2016 12:44 pm

Overdue thanks dudes!!

mick
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Re: Does anyone use Monster headphones?

Post by mick » Mon Jan 04, 2016 4:59 am

I would recommend taking a listen because some headphones are more tuned to classical and you require hard rock.

MRJONAH
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Re: Does anyone use Monster headphones?

Post by MRJONAH » Tue Jan 05, 2016 9:46 am

Thanks mick,
I thought of doing that at yard sales or pawn shops. I didn't want to "buy and try" new ones and have to deal with returns and hassles. But once I found one I liked I would buy them new. I suggested Monster because I use their guitar cables, was trying to stand brand specific. Their cables are really good. The earbuds were a big disappointment. They had that phase-y mute-y sound. Like when you're not plugged all the way in. Other expenses keep getting in the way.

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Mark Bliss
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Re: Does anyone use Monster headphones?

Post by Mark Bliss » Wed Jan 06, 2016 5:41 pm

I think that no matter the genre, you have to consider what the headphones are designed for. And what you intend to use them for. While there are somewhat different considerations for mixing, as opposed to recording, both are far different than what is marketed for casual listening.
Many common consumer grade headphones intended for casual listening add bass or brightness that can be misleading, especially if used for mixing, where you really want to consider a product designed for the purpose, with a "flat" response, not just an off the shelf headphone set, which are like listening with an EQ preset already added.

"In recording, the term “Flat” refers to EQ frequencies that are arranged in centered neutral positions. Essentially this means that the characteristics of a recording, whether from an instrument, vocal, sound effect, etc. will sound authentic during playback, exactly as they did when recorded. This means no alteration in the sound due to frequency enhancements via EQ, compression or other processes.

When it comes to final playback, such as a CD or digital audio file, a Flat mix is generally not desirable because the playback can sound dull or lifeless (especially depending on the speakers or headphones you listen through). This is why EQ’ing is often reserved for the final mixing stage of a recording. This is why, it comes to mixing, a Flat mix at the beginning (no EQ, compression or other enhancements) can be a great asset. Here’s why.

In mixing, the term “Reference” refers to a the audio character coming from a listening device or system, such as a pair of monitors or headphones that doesn’t alter the quality of the audio from its original source.

Here’s where “Flat” has its benefits, particularly when mixing through headphones. If your headphones are designed to enhance specific audio frequencies, adding EQ to pump up bass and high end, the acoustic guitar (for example) will sound brighter in the Reference mix because the headphones are adding EQ on the high end. Here’s why this becomes a problem in mixing. If your headphones are already boosting EQ in the mid to high end range, you will not perceive the need to add EQ.

Essentially you will be mixing your song through a pair of headphones that is not giving you a true representation of the original track. The result will be a final mix that can sound muddier, with more middle range, since you did not hear the need to boost the mid to high end through your EQ altered headphone mix.

When it comes to creating a great mix, EQ can be your friend, and that means a pair of headphones with a Flat Response is also your friend. But remember: the benefits of using EQ are often only as good as the pair of headphones you mix through, and in general, the flatter the response, especially for mixing and recording, the better."

Here are some tips for EQ’ing as it relates to mixing:

50-60 Hz
• Thump in a kick drum
• Boom in a bassline
• Too much results in the mix sounding flappy
• Too little results in a mix that lacks weight or depth
100-200 Hz
• Adds punch in a snare
• Gives richness to the mix
• Too much results in a boomy mix
• Too little sounds thin and cold
200-500 Hz
• Crucial for warmth and weight in guitars, piano and vocals
• Too much makes things sound muddy or congested
• Too little makes mix sound thin and weak
500-1000 Hz
• Gives body and tone to many instruments
• Too much sounds hollow, nasal or honky
• Too little sounds thin and harsh
2 kHz
• Gives edge and bite to guitars and vocals
• Adds aggression and clarity
• Too much can be difficult to listen to
• Too little will sound soft or muted
5-10 kHz
• Adds clarity, open-ness and life
• Important for the top end of drums, especially snare
• Too much sounds gritty or scratchy
• Too little will lack presence and energy
16 kHz
• Can add air, space or sparkle
• Almost too high to hear
• Too much will sound artificial, hyped or fizzy
• Too little will sound dull and stifled
Stay in tune, Mark

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MRJONAH
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Re: Does anyone use Monster headphones?

Post by MRJONAH » Fri Jan 08, 2016 9:39 am

Whoa-thanks for the great info Mark! With these Monsters I'm not really sure what the deal is. In M.C. 7 well I told you already. But in the Mp3 player, sounds great. Maybe it's the push to talk button they have. Which I didn't notice when I ordered them. It seems to be a useless feature. Or just maybe one dud out of a production line. Still can hunting......will advise..thanks again all.

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